Coaching Guidelines

DAILY OUTLINE

For each event,  depending on whether its a comp, demo or coaching, you will need to follow a certain procedure between the actual activities. Use this as a guide to Coordinate everything perfectly.

You can access everything you require at http://www.skateboardingfederation.com.au/asf-mobile-management/

  1. Complete risk assessment of skatepark and equipment
  2. confirm all participants have signed a waiver, if not fill one out.
  3. confirm all participants are wearing helmets.
  4. Run your class.
  5. When its over, fill out the event report. Remember you need at least 1 parent or participant to provide feedback.
  6. Send pictures to your manager.
  7. Pack up and head home.

WRISTBANDS

Rather than having people come down with waivers filled out each week,  once someone has filled out the initial waiver form they will receive an Armband to wear to show they are registered.

If a participant is wearing an armband they will not need to sign another waiver.

COACHING BASICS

There is no right or wrong way to coach, every child learns differently and you are welcome to adapt what you know to suit the participant. The most important thing is following the guidelines and making sure its a safe environment for everyone to learn on that is all inclusive.

Prerequisites

  1. Penny Boards & Longboards: DO NOT COACH ANYONE ON A PENNY BOARD OR LONGBOARD. THEY ARE NOT MADE FOR MODERN SKATEPARKS AND IT USUALLY WILL RESULT IN INJURY.
  2. Helmet requirements: Helmets are required for all participants under 18 years and it is recommended, but not necessary for people over 18.

Beginners

When teaching beginners of all ages, start them on flatground, make sure they:

  • Have feet on the deck bolts.
  • Shoulders straight
  • Have them shuffle left to right and back and forth to get a feel for the boards movement.
  • Make sure they keep low and knees bent as much as possible.

Before anyone uses ramps,  you can teach:

  • Pushing
  • Tic Tacs
  • Manuals
  • Crabwalks

Once they seem comfortable on a board, you can try:

  • Going up a bank
  • Kick turns on banks
  • Rolling in on banks
  • Ollies

(make sure you advise them to keep low on the banks at first)

Once they are comfortable on banks you can teach:

  • Dropping in (start with 2 hands help, then 1 hand, then no hands)
  • Ollie fakies on banks
  • Ollies over hips

Intermediates & Experienced

These people generally have a stronger understanding of skateboarding and know their tricks and what they want to learn.

In these scenarios help them through what they want to learn but if something seems out of reach it is best to work on something they can achieve during that lesson, and come back to the harder trick at another time.

PARTICIPANT SAFETY

Safety is simple provided you follow the guides on the risk assessment and the correct coaching procedures.

The risk assessment keeps the park as a safe environment and also ensures that participants are at minimal risk.

Provided you have the waiver forms completed and the risk assessment completed, you will also be protected under your insurance policy.

INSURANCE

To be able to facilitate an event or class under ASF, you will need a minimum of $20 million public liability and $1 million professional indemnity insurance.  if youre working for a registered provider you will be covered, if not you can purchase insurance through the ASF.

CODE OF CONDUCT

When managing events, you will deal with participants, other coaches, officials, parents and the general public.  When a skatepark is booked the organisation in charge has full authority on the skatepark.  Sometimes people can make things difficult for you to do your job and its hard to know what to do in certain circumstances.  Its important to familiarise yourself with the ASF Code of Conduct for events so you know what to do if these situations occur.