Code of Conduct

PARENT’S CODE

  1. Do not force an unwilling youngster to participate in Skateboarding.
  2. Remember, young people are involved in Skateboarding for their enjoyment, not yours.
  3. Encourage your child to always play by the rules and follow directions of officials.
  4. Teach young people that honest effort is as important as victory, so the result is accepted without undue disappointment.
  5. Teach working towards skill improvement and good sportsmanship. Never ridicule or yell at your child for making a mistake.
  6. Remember that young people learn best by example. Applaud good skill  from others.
  7. Do not publicly question an official’s decision or score.
  8. Support all efforts to remove verbal and physical abuse from Skateboarding.
  9. Recognise the value and importance of coaches and officials. They give of their time and resources to provide recreational activities for young people.

SPECTATOR’S CODE

  1. Remember that young people play for their own fun. They are not there to entertain you.
  2. Be on your best behaviour. Don’t use offensive language, or harass participants,competitors, coaches or officials.
  3. Applaud good skill.
  4. Show respect for opponents.
  5. Never ridicule or scold someone for making a mistake.
  6. Condemn the use of violence in all forms.
  7. Respect the officials’ decisions.
  8. SLEDGING CANNOT BE ACCEPTED in any shape or form.
  9. Remember you can and will be ejected and / or banned for breach of this code.

INSTRUCTOR & OFFICIAL’S CODE

  1. You have responsibility for those involved and connected to you. EXERCISE IT.
  2. Be reasonable in your demands on the young person’s  time, energy and enthusiasm.
  3. Ensure that all participants get a game. The ‘just average’ participants need and deserve equal time.
  4. Remember that young people play for fun and enjoyment.
  5. Never ridicule or yell about mistakes.
  6. Develop respect for the ability of opponents, as well as for the judgment of officials.
  7. Follow the advice of a doctor regarding injury.
  8. Remember that young people need a coach they can respect. Be generous with your praise when it is deserved and set a good example.
  9. Make a personal commitment to keep yourself informed on sound coaching principles and the principles of growth and development of young people.
  10. Create opportunities to teach sportsmanship, just as you would in teaching the basic skills.
  11. Ensure that efforts for both skill improvement and good sportsmanship are rewarded by praise.
  12. Ensure that skill learning and free play activities have priority over highly structured competitions for very young people.
  13. INSIST ON FAIR PLAY, do not tolerate foul play, fighting, or foul language. Be prepared to remove an offender.
  14. Set a good example by personal good behaviour.